Special Report: Walkable Streets

Vision Zero Bolted Onto Road Safety Status Quo

Vision Zero is not just some hand-wavy "principles and values" you can say you support and then go back to doing what you were already doing.

By Ryan McGreal
Published March 31, 2016

This article has been updated.

The April 4, 2016 Public Works Committee meeting includes an update on the City's Strategic Road Safety Program. We can't link directly to it since the city's meeting agenda website is unusable-by-design, but it's item 8.2 under "Discussion Items".

The Strategic Road Safety Program is funded by the Red Light Camera fund and budgets $2.2 million in projects for 2016. The Red Light Camera fund adds $2.5 million a year and is currently sitting with a $9.5 million balance.

The 2016 budget includes $120,000 for construction of permanent traffic calming (for example, poured-concrete bumpouts), another $250,000 for temporary traffic calming (for example, installing screw-on speed humps and knockdown sticks) and $700,000 for durable-paint ladder crossings. (See table 1, bottom of this article, for the full list of budget items and costs.)

City workers install a speed hump at Glenfern and Mountain (RTH file photo)
City workers install a speed hump at Glenfern and Mountain (RTH file photo)

Staff note that more than 200 durable-paint ladder crossings have already been installed at various locations around the city over the past three years. (See table 2, bottom of this article, for the full list of locations.)

The program also includes $100,000 in capital funding for a 2016 pilot project to install three to five pedestrian crossovers (PXOs) under the new Provincial rules that took effect at the start of this year.

One of the first locations will be the dangerous and currently uncontrolled intersection of Herkimer and Queen.

Mobile speed radar at Herkimer and Queen (Image Credit: Kirkdendall Neighbourhood Association)
Mobile speed radar at Herkimer and Queen (Image Credit: Kirkdendall Neighbourhood Association)

The following year, staff plan to increase the spending to $500,000 and roll the new PXOs out more widely.

The results to date also include 17 temporary traffic calming projects in 2015. (See table 4, bottom of this article, for a full list of temporary bumpouts in Hamilton.)

Hand-Wavy Commitment to Vision Zero

A major announcement in this update is the integration of Ward 3 Councillor Matthew Green's Vision Zero motion into the City's existing Strategic Road Safety Program after Council approved the motion.

Unfortunately, it does not sound like Council's commitment to Vision Zero will have a big impact on how the City undertakes road safety.

On a positive note, the update includes a succinct summary of the Vision Zero approach:

Vision Zero is the 1997 Swedish approach to road safety thinking. It can be summarized in one sentence: No loss of life is acceptable. The Vision Zero approach has proven highly successful and has been adopted by City's such as the City of Edmonton and New York City and a number of other Municipalities in the United States. Vision Zero is based on the simple fact that people are human and humans make mistakes. The road system needs to keep us moving. But it must also be designed to protect road users at every turn.

So far, so good. But the update then goes on to state, "Staff suggests that the Hamilton Strategic Road Safety Program Vision, Mission and Values are already aligned with the Principles and Values of Vision Zero." This is a big red flag, because it indicates that staff believe what we're currently doing in terms of road safety is good enough.

Councillor Green's Vision Zero motion contained a number of specific measures intended to drive a shift in the city's approach to safety, including "a review of best practice from comparable jurisdictions", "Specific recommendations to improve road safety, particularly for pedestrians and cyclists, over the short, medium and long terms" and "a regular reporting mechanism to track progress."

Not to worry: according to the Update, staff are already doing all of the items on the list!

Resistance to Change

This is a worrying sign of institutional resistance to change. No one likes to admit that the way they have been doing things needs to change, but the level of doubling-down on the status quo is pretty disturbing.

Vision Zero is not just some hand-wavy "principles and values" you can say you support and then go back to doing what you were already doing. It has a very specific objective: eliminate traffic fatalities. It also has a very specific method: obey the laws of physics and follow the evidence.

One may be forgiven for thinking that a City commitment to Vision Zero should also a be commitment to eliminating traffic fatalities. Yet the Program's goals remain the same as they were before Council approved Green's motion: "reduce fatal and injury collisions (combined) and property damage only collisions each by 10% every three year period." (That's exactly the same goal for injury and fatality reduction that we had from 2009-2012.)

This goal undermines our commitment to Vision Zero in two ways. First, it combines fatal and injury collisions whereas Vision Zero draws a sharp distinction between them. Second, Vision Zero has the goal of eliminating fatalities, not just reducing them.

40 km/h Limit Too High

Here's an immediate example of the disconnect between what we're doing and what a real commitment to Vision Zero would entail. Staff tout over 200 targeted speed limit reductions to 40 km/h in school zones and on residential streets (see Table 3, bottom of this article). Further, Hamilton is working with other municipalities to ask the Province to change the Highway Traffic Act to allow municipalities to set a default speed limit of 40 km/h instead of 50 km/h.

40 km/h speed limit signs ready to be deployed (Image Credit: City of Hamilton)
40 km/h speed limit signs ready to be deployed (Image Credit: City of Hamilton)

These are positive changes, to be sure, but the evidence clearly indicates that we need to reduce speed limits to 30 km/h, not 40 km/h, if we want to eliminate pedestrian fatalities.

Reducing vehicle speeds from 50 km/h to 40 km/h reduces pedestrian fatality risk in a collision from 45 percent to around 20 percent, but cutting speeds to 30 km/h reduces pedestrian fatality risk to almost zero.

There is no arguing with physics: cities that are really committed to Vision Zero must also commit to a 30 km/h speed limit. Several cities, including Edinburgh, Bristol and Paris, have responded to the evidence by reducing speeds to 30 km/h.

And we don't need to go to Europe: just down the highway, Toronto is also moving quickly to set 30 km/h speed limits on its residential streets.

30 km/h speed limit on Toronto street (RTH file photo)
30 km/h speed limit on Toronto street (RTH file photo)

There is no reason Hamilton cannot do the same thing and every reason why we should do it. In fact, three years ago Hamilton implemented a 30 km/h speed limit on most streets in the North End Neighbourhood - but only on the condition that no other neighbourhood is allowed to ask for the same consideration for at least five years!

Instead of expanding this pilot to other neighbourhoods across the city, we are choosing a mushy compromise speed that is not low enough to eliminate traffic fatalities, but may be perceived as a less controversial sell to people who care more about driving fast than creating safe neighbourhoods.

We Can Do Better

It may seem that I'm being unfair here. After all, compared to the way things used to be, the situation is definitely improved. Culture change happens slowly, and staff are to be commended for the the groundwork already laid - including the re-establishment of the Strategic Road Safety Program in 2014, after it had been effectively disbanded in 2009.

However, the only way to make a truly visionary change to the City is to evaluate what we're doing against what we could be doing if we committed fully. By that standard, we still have a lot more to do to live up to our new on-paper commitment to Vision Zero.

The first thing we need to do is let go of the defensive claim that we're already doing enough. Quite simply, we are not doing enough - even though we are doing better.

With the expected appointment of a new General Manager of Public Works some time this year, we have a very exciting opportunity to reset the corporate culture in Public Works and really bring Vision Zero to life in practice as well as words.

Tables

Table 1: 2016 Strategic Road Safety Budget
Source: City of Hamilton Report PW16027, Appendix F
Item Budget
Collision System Upgrade $100,000
Durable Ladder Crosswalks $700,000
EDR Installation $15,000
Miscellaneous Safety Request $150,000
New Pedestrian Crossover Program $100,000
Permanent Construction - Traffic Calming $120,000
Public Safety and Education Campaign $110,000
RHVP/LINC Speed Monitoring $200,000
School Zone Flasher Installation $75,000
School Zone Flasher Upgrade and Replacement $120,000
School Zone Signing $60,000
Speed Reduction Signing $200,000
Temporary Traffic Calming $250,000
Total (Est.) $2,200,000
Table 2: New Ladder Crosswalk Installations Since 2013
Source: City of Hamilton Report PW16027, Appendix D
Year Ward Address
2013 1 Aberdeen Ave. at Dundurn St.
2013 1 Dundurn St. S. at Earl Kitchener School
2013 1 Haddon Ave. S. at King St.
2013 1 Herkimer St. at Kent St.
2013 1 Locke St. at Charlton Ave. W.
2013 1 Locke St. at Chatham St.
2013 1 Locke St. at Herkimer St.
2013 1 Locke St. at Hunter St.
2013 1 Locke St. at King St W.
2013 1 Locke St. at Stanley Ave.
2013 1 Locke St. at Tuckett St.
2013 1 Locke St. at York Blvd.
2013 1 Sterling St. at Forsyth Ave.
2013 1 Strathcona Ave. at King St. W.
2013 2 Cannon St. E. at Elgin St.
2013 2 James St. N. at Burlington St. W.
2013 2 James St. N. at Picton St. W.
2013 2 James St. N. at Simcoe St. W.
2013 2 John St. N at Simcoe St. E.
2013 2 John St. N. at Wood St. W.
2013 2 Park St. S. and Hunter St. W.
2013 3 Cannon St. at Smith Ave.
2013 3 Cannon St. E. at Barnesdale Ave. N.
2013 3 Cannon St. E. at Lottridge St.
2013 3 Cannon St. E. at Wentworth St. N.
2013 3 King/Main (at The Delta)
2013 4 Bold St. S. at Bay St. S.
2013 4 Cannon St. at Province St. N.
2013 4 Maplewood Ave. at Gage Ave.
2013 4 Maplewood Ave. at Springer Ave.
2013 6 Broker Dr. at Brentwood Dr.
2013 6 Broker Dr. at Kingslea Dr.
2013 6 Upper Gage Ave. at Fennell Ave.
2013 6 Upper Gage Ave. at Mohawk Rd. E.
2013 7 Fennell Ave. at Upper James St.
2013 7 Mohawk At Upper James St.
2013 7 Mohawk Rd. E. at Mall Rd.
2013 7 Mohawk Rd. E. at Upper Wellington St.
2013 7 Mohawk Rd. E. at Upper Wentworth St.
2013 8 Magnolia Dr. and Mohawk Rd. W.
2013 10 Barton at Escarpment Dr.
2013 10 Barton St. E. at Lewis Rd.
2013 10 Fruitland Rd. N/Leg at Hwy. 8
2013 10 Fruitland Rd. S/Leg at Barton St. E.
2013 12 McNiven Rd. at Rousseau School
2013 13 Sydenham Rd. at Alma St.
2013 13 Sydenham Rd. at Melville St.
2013 15 Carlisle Rd. at Centre Rd.
2013 15 Centre Rd. and 6th Concession
2013 15 Dundas St. and Hamilton St.
2013 15 Dundas St. and Main St.
2013 15 Dundas St. and Mill St.
2013 15 Millgrove Side Rd. and 5th Concession, Millgrove
2014 1 Barton St. E. at Crooks St.
2014 1 Bond St. N. at Glen Rd.
2014 1 Glen Rd. at Kipling Rd.
2014 1 Glen Rd. at Longwood Rd. N.
2014 1 Hess St. S.at Markland St.
2014 1 King St. W. at Dundurn St. S.
2014 1 King St. W. West of Bond St. N.
2014 1 Locke St. N. at Florence St.
2014 1 Locke St. N. at Napier St.
2014 1 Locke St. N. at Peter St.
2014 1 Longwood Rd. at 175 Longwood Rd.
2014 1 Main St. W. at Dundurn St. S
2014 1 Strathcona Ave. N. at Florence St.
2014 1 Strathcona Ave. N. at Head St.
2014 1 Strathcona Ave. N. at Lamoreaux St.
2014 2 Hunter St. W. at MacNab St. S.
2014 2 Locke St. S. at Herkimer St.
2014 2 Main St. W. at Summers Ln.
2014 2 Queen St. N. at York Blvd.
2014 2 Queen St. S. at Duke St.
2014 2 Queen St. S. at Hunter St. W.
2014 2 Queen St. S. at Main St. W.
2014 3 Burlington St. E. at Dofasco
2014 3 Burlington St. E. at Ottawa St. N.
2014 3 Cannon St. E. at Barnesdale Ave.
2014 3 Cannon St. E. at Lottridge St.
2014 3 King St. E. at Maple Ave.
2014 3 Main St. E. at Springer Ave.
2014 3 Ottawa St S. at King St. E.
2014 3 Ottawa St. N. at Cannon St. E.
2014 6 Mountain Brow Blvd. at Upper Ottawa St.
2014 6 Upper Ottawa St. at Redbury St.
2014 7 Hester St. at Greeningdon Dr.
2014 7 Queensdale Ave. E. at East 26th St.
2014 7 Upper Sherman Ave. at Burkholder Dr.
2014 7 Upper Wellington St. at Howe Ave.
2014 8 Rymal Rd. W. at Spadara Dr./Davinci Blvd.
2014 9 Barton St. E. at Covington St.
2014 9 Highway 8 at Kilbourn Ave.
2014 9 King St. E. at Green Forest Dr.
2014 10 490 Hwy. 8 Between Dewitt Rd. and Spartan Ave.
2014 11 Binbrook Rd. at Hwy. 56
2014 12 Amberly Blvd. at Concerto Crt.
2014 12 Liam Dr. at Braithwaite Ave.
2014 13 Main St. at Governors Rd./Dundas St.
2014 15 Hollybush Dr. at Ryans Way
2015 1 Arnold St. at Haddon Ave.
2015 1 Dalewood Ave. at King St. W.
2015 1 Main St .W. at Thorndale St. S.
2015 1 Main St. W. at Cottrill St.
2015 1 Main St. W. at Ewen Rd.
2015 1 Main St. W. at Hollywood St. S.
2015 1 Main St. W. at Kingsmount St. S.
2015 1 Main St. W. at Norfolk St. S.
2015 1 Sussex St. at Emerson St.
2015 2 Charlton Ave. E. and Walnut St. S.
2015 2 Hunter St. E. at John St. S.
2015 2 Hunter St. W. at James St. S.
2015 2 Wilson St. at Mary St.
2015 3 Burton St. at Douglas Ave.
2015 3 Delaware Ave. at Wentworth St. S.
2015 3 Kenilworth Ave. N. at Roxborough Ave.
2015 3 King St. E. at Gailmont Dr.
2015 3 Sherman Ave. N. at Beechwood Ave.
2015 4 Barton St. E. at Ottawa St. N.
2015 4 Catharine St. N. at Macauley St. E.
2015 4 Catharine St. N. at Picton St. E.
2015 4 Centennial Pkwy. N. at Barton St. E.
2015 4 Centennial Pkwy. N. at Delawana Dr.
2015 4 Charlton Ave. E. at Ferguson Ave. S.
2015 4 Dunsmure Ed. at Ottawa St. N.
2015 4 Ferguson Ave. S. at Forest Ave.
2015 4 Forest Ave. at Walnut St. S.
2015 4 King St. E. at Wexford Ave. S.
2015 4 Maplewood Ave. at Springer Ave.
2015 5 Barnesdale Ave. N. at Beechwood Ave.
2015 5 Barnesdale Ave. N. at Edward St.
2015 5 Barnesdale Ave. N. at Rosemont Ave.
2015 5 Barnesdale Ave. N. at Somerset Ave.
2015 5 Delawana Dr. at Grandville Ave.
2015 5 Delawana Dr. at Riverdale Dr.
2015 5 Greenford Dr. at Cromwell Cres.
2015 5 Greenford Dr. at Dover Dr.
2015 5 Greenford Dr. at Owen Pl.
2015 5 Kimberly Dr. at Montrose Ave.
2015 5 King St. E. at East St. N.
2015 5 Main St. E. at Grosvenor Ave. S.
2015 5 Quigley Rd. at King St. E.
2015 6 Edgewood Ave. at High St.
2015 6 High St. at Brucedale Ave.
2015 6 Queensdale Ave. E. at East 23 St.
2015 6 Queensdale Ave. E. at Greenmeadow Rd.
2015 6 Queensdale Ave. E.at Nancy St.
2015 6 Quuensdale Ave. E. at Rendell Blvd.
2015 6 Sandlewood Ave. at Brentwood Dr.
2015 6 Upper Ottawa St/ at Anson Ave.
2015 7 Atherley Dr. at Rexford Dr.
2015 7 Atherley Dr. at Upper Sherman Ave.
2015 7 East 25th St. at Mohawk Rd. E.
2015 7 Fennell Ave. E.at East 38th St.
2015 7 Princip St. at Rexford Dr.
2015 7 Upper Gage Ave. at Sunning Hill Ave.
2015 7 Upper Wellington St. at Inverness Ave.E.
2015 7 Upper Wellington St. at Jay St.
2015 8 Fennell Ave. E. at Upper James St.
2015 8 Folkstone Ave. at Berko Ave.
2015 8 Limeridge Rd. W. at Elgar Ave.
2015 8 Mohawk Rd. W. at Upper Paradise Rd.
2015 8 Rymal Rd. W. at Davinci Blvd.
2015 8 Stone Church Rd. at Upper Paradise Rd.
2015 8 Stone Church Rd. W. at Juliebeth Dr.
2015 9 Candlewood Dr. at Whitedeer Rd.
2015 9 Gatestone Dr. at Foxtrot Dr.
2015 9 Gatestone Dr. at Highbury Dr.
2015 9 Gordon Drummond Ave. at Kennard St.
2015 9 Gray Rd. at Roxborough Ave.
2015 9 Highland Rd. W. at Leckie Ave.
2015 9 Isaac Brock Dr. at Gordon Drummond Ave.
2015 9 Odessa St. at John Murray St.
2015 9 Paramount Dr. at Amberwood St.
2015 9 Paramount Dr. at Apex Crt.
2015 9 Paramount Dr. at Astra St.
2015 9 Paramount Dr. at Marston St.
2015 9 Paramount Dr. at Mistywood Dr.
2015 9 Paramount Dr. at St. Pauls Trail
2015 9 Parkvista Pl. at Kennard St.
2015 9 Slinger Ave. at Highbury Dr.
2015 10 Barton St. E. at Mountain View School
2015 10 Dewitt Rd. at Dupont St.
2015 10 Fifty Rd. at North Service Rd.
2015 10 Hwy. 8 at St.Francis Xavier Church
2015 10 President Dr. at Adriatic Blvd.
2015 10 President Dr. at Farmingdale Cres.
2015 10 Puritan St. at Macintosh Dr.
2015 11 Inverness at East 19th St.
2015 11 Inverness Ave. at East 18th St.
2015 12 Bridgeport Cres. at Kitty Murray Ln.
2015 12 Citation Cres. at Meadowlands Blvd.
2015 12 Great Oak Trail at Downing St.
2015 12 Great Oak Trail at Magnificent Way
2015 12 Great Oak Trail at Windwood Dr.
2015 12 Jerseyville Rd. W. at Meadowbrook Dr.
2015 12 Kitty Murray Ln. at Steeplechase Dr.
2015 12 Pumpkin Pass at Blue Ribbon Way
2015 13 Dunham Dr. at Wilson St. W.
2015 13 Golflinks Rd. at Elm Hill Blvd.
2015 13 King St. at Ogilvie St.
2015 14 King St. at Albert St..
2015 14 York Rd. at Cameron Ave.
2016 3 King William St. at East Ave. N.
2016 3 Victoria Ave. N. at King William St.
2016 3 Victoria Ave. N. at Wilson St.
2016 3 Wilson St. at East Ave. N.
2016 5 King St. E. at Maple Ave.
2016 5 King St. E. at Nash Rd.
2016 5 King St. E. at Wexford Ave. S.
Table 3: 40 km/h Speed Limits Installed in 2015
Source: City of Hamilton Report PW16027, Appendix A
Ward Street From To
1 Arnold St. Forsyth Ave. Haddon Ave.
1 Binkley Cres. End To End
1 Binkley Rd. End To End
1 Cottrill St. End To End
1 Daleview Ct. End To End
1 Devonport St. Tom St. York Blvd.
1 Emerson St. Main St. Ward Ave.
1 Florence St. Dundurn St. N. Ray St. N.
1 Glenmount Ave. End To End
1 Head St. Dundurn St. N. Strathcona Ave. N.
1 Hollywood St. N. End To End
1 Hollywood St. S. End To End
1 Inchbury St. Florence St. York Blvd.
1 Kingsmount St. N. End To End
1 Kingsmount St. S. End To End
1 Leland St. Main St. Mapes Ave.
1 Locke St. N. King St. W. York Blvd.
1 Market St. Queen St. N. Ray St. N.
1 Morden St. Locke St. N. Pearl St. N.
1 Napier St. Locke St. N. Queen St. N.
1 Norfolk St. N. End To End
1 Norfolk St. S. End To End
1 Pearl St. N. King St. W. York Blvd.
1 Peel St. Morden St. Napier St.
1 Peter St. Locke St. N. Queen St. N.
1 Ray St. N. King St. West York Blvd.
1 Rifle Range Rd. Main St. W. To S. End
1 Sanders Blvd. West Park Ave. Norfolk St. N.
1 Strathcona Ave. N. King St. West York Blvd.
1 Sussex St. Leland St. Bowman St.
1 Thorndale Cres. End To End
1 Thorndale St. N. End To End
1 Thorndale St. S. End To End
1 Tom St. Dundurn St. N. Strathcona Ave. N.
1 Wellesley St. Morden St. Napier St.
1 West Park Ave. End To End
1 Westbourne Rd. Sanders Blvd. Main St. W.
2 Cathcart St. Cannon St. E. Wilson St.
2 Charlton Ave. E. 145m west of Wentworth St S Wentworth St. S.
2 Ferguson Ave. Charlton Ave. Young St.
2 Forest Ave. Catharine St. Wellington St.
2 Grant Ave. Main St. Southerly End
2 Hess St. N. Market St. Barton St. W.
2 Kelly St. End To End
2 Kingsway Dr. Arkledun Ave. John St. S.
2 Louisa Ave. Mountwood Ave. John St. S.
2 Mary St. Cannon St. E. Rebecca St.
2 Mary St. Rebecca St. Cannon St.
2 Walnut Ave. Charlton Ave. E. Young St.
2 Wentworth St. S. Cumberland Ave. Charlton Ave. E.
3 Dunsmure Rd. Ottawa St. N. King St. E.
3 Springer Ave. Main St. East Maplewood Ave.
4 Brunswick St. Melvin Ave. Barton St.
4 Central Ave. Reid Ave. S. Cochrane Rd.
4 Dunsmure Rd. Kenilworth Ave. N. Strathearne Ave.
4 Eastwood St. Melvin Ave. Heath St.
4 Edgemont St. King St. Maple Ave.
4 Frederick Ave. Roxborough Ave. Cannon St.
4 Glencairn Ave. Central Ave. King St. E.
4 Glenholme Ave. Central Ave. King St. E.
4 Graham Ave. King St. Main St.
4 Graham St. Roxborough Ave. Dunsmure Rd.
4 Heath St. Sumach St. Eastwood St.
4 Holmesdale Ave. Lucerne Ave. King St. E.
4 Houghton Ave. King St. Maple Ave.
4 Lucerne Ave. Parkdale Ave. S. Cochrane Rd.
4 Maple Ave. Park Row S. Huxley Ave S.
4 Melvin Ave. Airdrie Ave. Talbot St.
4 Osborne St. Melvin Ave. Barton St.
4 Province St. Cannon St. Dunsmure Rd.
4 Roxborough Ave. Edgemont St. Robins Ave.
4 Roxborough Ave. Kenilworth Ave. N. Strathearne Ave.
4 Sumach St. Melvin Ave. Heath St.
4 Summerhill Ave. Central Ave. King St. E.
4 Talbot St. Melvin Ave. Barton St.
4 Tragina Ave. N. Main St. East Britannia Ave.
4 Walter Ave. S. Queenston Rd. King St. E.
4 Weaverly St. Melvin Ave. Barton St.
4 Weir St. N. Main St. E. Britannia Ave.
4 Woodward Ave. Melvin Ave. Barton St.
5 Delawana Ave. Centennial Pkwy Lake Ave.
5 Greenhill Ave. Westerly to End Mount Albion Rd
5 Montmorency Dr. Mount Albion Rd To End
5 Nicklaus Dr. St. Andrews Dr. Albright Rd.
5 Red Hill Ave Mount Albion Rd. Montmorency Dr.
6 Adler Ave. Independence Dr. Templemead Dr.
6 Brucedale Ave. E. Upper Gage Ave. Upper Ottawa St.
6 East 45th St. Fennell Ave. E. Kerr St.
6 Green Meadow Rd Kerr St. Everton Pl.
5 Red Hill Ave Mount Albion Rd. Montmorency Dr.
6 Adler Ave. Independence Dr. Templemead Dr.
6 Brucedale Ave. E. Upper Gage Ave. Upper Ottawa St.
6 East 45th St. Fennell Ave. E. Kerr St.
6 Green Meadow Rd Kerr St. Everton Pl.
6 Independence Dr. Mount Pleasant Dr. Templemead Dr.
6 Kerr St. End To End
6 Loconder Dr. Queen Victoria Dr. Upper Gage Ave.
6 Mount Pleasant Dr. End To End
6 Nancy St. Queensdale Ave. E. Everton Pl.
6 Quaker Cres. End To End
6 Queen Victoria Dr. End To End
6 Queensdale Ave. E. Upper Gage Ave. Upper Ottawa St.
6 Quinn Ave. Queen Victoria Dr. Stone Church Rd. E.
6 Rainham St. Queen Victoria Dr. Quaker Cres.
6 Raleigh St. Queen Victoria Dr. Rainham St.
6 Redbury St. Upper Ottawa St. Queen Victoria Dr.
6 Rendell Blvd. Fennell Ave. E. Everton Pl.
6 Rochelle Ave. Queen Victoria Dr. Stone Church Rd. E.
6 Rowena Ct. Quaker Cres. To westerly End
6 Royal Vista Dr. Upper Gage Ave. Templemead Dr.
6 Templemead Dr. End To End
7 Atherley Dr. Upper Sherman Ave. Rexford Dr.
7 Berko Ave. Upper Sherman Ave. Edwina Pl.
7 East 24th St. Upper Wentworth St. Fennell Ave.
7 East 25th St. Mohawk Rd. Fennell Ave.
7 East 27th St. Burkholder Dr. Fennell Ave.
7 East 28th St. Franklin Rd. Fennell Ave.
7 Edwina Pl. Berko Ave. Upper Gage Ave.
7 Folkstone Ave. Berko Ave. Lawson St.
7 Franklin Rd. Upper Wentworth St. Upper Sherman Ave.
7 Hamilton Ave. Concession St. Mountain Park Ave
7 Inverness Ave. East 16th St. Upper Wentworth St.
7 Jeremiah Ct. Lawson St. To End
7 Lawson St. Folkstone Ave. Edwina Pl.
7 Mountville Ave. Upper Wellington St. East 18th St.
7 Princip St. Upper Sherman Ave. Rexford Dr.
7 Rawlings Ave. Rowntree Dr. Rowntree Dr.
7 Redfern Ave. Chedmac Dr. Sanatorium Rd.
7 Regal Dr. Rowntree Dr. Upper Sherman Ave.
7 Rexford Dr. Robson Cres. (west leg) Astonwood Dr.
7 Ross Ave. Rowntree Dr. Rowntree Dr.
7 Rowntree Dr. Upper Sherman Ave. Rowntree Dr.
7 Viewpoint Ave. Concession St. Mountain Park Ave
8 Alderson Dr. Westerly Limit Upper James St.
8 Amalfi St. Upper Horning Rd. Greencedar Dr.
8 Atkins Dr. Golfwood Dr. Greencedar Dr.
8 Christie St. Rymal Rd. W. Christopher Dr.
8 Christopher Dr. Malton Dr. Upper James St.
8 Golfwood Dr. Guildwood Dr. Greencedar Dr.
8 Greencedar Dr. Guildwood Dr. Gurnett Dr./Guildwood Dr.
8 Greenguild Ave. Greencedar Dr. Gurnett Dr.
8 Guildwood Dr. Greencedar Dr. Upper Horning Rd.
8 Gurnett Dr. Greencedar Dr. Omni Blvd.
8 Kennedy Ave. Westerly Limit Upper James St.
8 Malton Dr. Christopher Dr. Upper James St.
8 Novoco Dr. Upper Paradise Rd. Guildwood Dr.
8 Omni Blvd. Stone Church Rd. W. Upper Horning/Gurnett Dr.
8 Upper Horning Rd. Omni Blvd. Northerly End of Upper Horning Rd
9 Amberly Blvd. Fiddler’s Green Rd. Wilson St. W.
9 Amberwood Dr. Paramount Dr. Canfield Ct.
9 Aubrey Ave. Highland Rd. W. Southerly End
9 Branthaven Dr. William Johnson St. (West Leg) First Rd. W.
9 Breezewood Rd. Glenhollow Dr. Marston St.
9 Burwell Ave. Donn Ave. Canterbury Ave.
9 Byron Ave. Foxmeadow Dr. Aubrey Ave.
9 Candlewood Dr. Whitedeer Rd. Foxmeadow Dr.
9 Canterbury Ave. Dale Ave. Collegiate Ave.
9 Collegiate Ave. Gray Rd. Lake Ave. Dr.
9 Dale Ave. Donn Ave. Canterbury Ave.
9 Donn Ave. Queenston Rd. Southerly End
9 Elm Ave. Mountain Ave. S. King St. E.
9 Evergreen Ave. Collegiate Ave. Passmore St.
9 First Rd. W. Mud St. Southerly End
9 First St. S. King St. W. Westerly End
9 Foxmeadow Dr. Candlewood Dr. Highbury Dr. (West Leg)
9 Foxtrot Dr. Gatestone Dr. Highbury Dr.
9 Gatestone Dr. Second Rd. W. Isaac Brock Dr.
9 Gordon Drummond Ave. Breezewood Rd. Isaac Brock Dr.
9 Gordon Drummond Ave. Breezewood Rd. Gordon Drummond Ave.
9 Highbury Dr. Gatestone Dr. Highland Rd. W.
9 Highgate Dr. Highbury Dr. Upper Centennial Pkwy
9 Highland Rd. W. Winterberry Dr. Upper Centennial Pkwy
9 Isaac Brock Dr. Mud St. First Rd. W.
9 James Ave. Donn Ave. Cartwright Ave.
9 John Murray St. First Rd. W. Isaac Brock Dr.
9 Lake Ave. S. King St. W. Maple Ave
9 Leckie Ave. Highland Rd. W. Byron Ave.
9 Maple Ave. Lake Ave. S. Mountain Ave. S.
9 Marston St. Paramount Dr. Gordon Drummond Ave.
9 Mellenby St. Branthaven Dr. John Murray St.
9 Mountain Ave. S. King St. E. Trevor Dr.
9 Odessa St. Rand St. (west leg) John Murray St.
9 Paramount Dr. Mud St. W. Winterberry Dr.
9 Parkvista Pl. Kennard St. Southerly End
9 Passmore St. Donn Ave. Gray Rd.
9 Pinewoods Dr. Highbury Dr. Highgate Dr.
9 Prideaux St. Willian Johnson St. Rand St.
9 Promenade Dr. Highbury Dr. Pinewoods Dr.
9 Rand St. Odessa St. Odessa St.
9 Second Rd. W. Rymal Rd. Highland Rd.
9 Shadyglen Dr. Hampshire Pl. Gatestone Dr.
9 Slinger Ave. First Rd. W. Highbury Dr.
9 Wardrope Ave. King St. W. Alba St.
9 William Johnson St, Isaac Brock Dr. Branthaven Dr. (East Leg)
12 Carnegie Pl. End To End
12 Cornwallis Rd. End To End
12 Council Cres. End To End
12 Crestwood St. End To End
12 Cumming Ct. Oakley Cres. Fiddler’s Green Rd.
12 Huron Ave. End To End
12 Jerseyville Rd. 130m west of Martin Rd. 380m west of Lloyminn Ave.
12 Manitou Way End To End
12 Mozart Dr. Symphony Pl. Cumming Ct.
12 Nakoma Rd. Senior Dr. Floresta Ct.
12 Seminole Rd. Wilson St. W. Council Cres.
12 Senior Dr. Stadacona Ave. Easterly End
12 Stadacona Ave. End To End
12 Waban Place End To End
13 Newcombe Rd. 80m N. of Winegarden Trail 25m N. of Cowper Ct.
15 Mazza Ave. Hwy. No. 5 Northerly limit
15 Riley St. Dundas St. E. Rockhaven Ln.
15 Sunnycroft Ct. Dundas St. E. Southerly limit
Table 4: All Temporary Speed Humps in Hamilton
Source: City of Hamilton Report PW16027, Appendix E
Year Quantity Ward Street From To
2013 1 2 Charlton Ave. W. Queen St. Kent St.
2013 1 2 Charlton Ave. W. Kent St. Locke St.
2013 1 3 St. Clair Ave. Main St. E. Dunsmure Rd.
2013 1 3 St. Clair Ave. Dunsmure Rd. King St.
2013 1 8 Forbes St. Blossom Ln. Citino St.
2013 1 8 Citino St. Forbes St. W. 5th St.
2013 1 8 Highgate Dr. Bankfield Cres. Pinewoods Dr.
2014 1 1 Glenfern Ave. Mountain Ave. Undermount Ave.
2014 1 1 South St. Mountain Ave. Beulah Ave.
2014 1 1 South St. Beulah Ave. Dundurn St.
2014 1 1 Glen Rd. Longwood Ave. Paradise Rd.
2014 1 1 Glen Rd. Paradise Rd. Macklin St.
2014 1 1 Mountain Ave. Hillcrest Ave. Glenfern Ave.
2014 1 1 Mountain Ave. Orchard Hill Aberdeen Ave.
2014 1 2 Picton St. Mary St. Ferguson Ave.
2014 1 2 Picton St. Ferguson Ave. Wellington St.
2014 1 2 Wood St. Mary St. Ferguson Ave.
2014 1 2 Wood St. Ferguson Ave. Wellington St.
2014 1 2 Ferrie St. Mary St. Ferguson Ave.
2014 1 2 Simcoe St. Mary St. Ferguson Ave.
2014 1 2 Macauley St. Mary St. Ferguson Ave.
2014 1 2 Mary St. Macauley St. Wood St.
2014 1 3 Macauley St. Ferguson Ave. Wellington St.
2014 2 1 New St. Main St. W. King St. W.
2014 2 1 Strathcona Ave. Main St. W. King St. W.
2015 1 1 Dow Ave. Main St. Paul St.
2015 1 2 Beulah Ave. Hillcrest Ave. South St.
2015 1 2 Mary St. Wilson St. Cannon St.
2015 1 2 Tisdale St. N. King William St. Wilson St.
2015 1 2 Young St. Ferguson Ave. Wellington St.
2015 1 2 Robinson St. Queen St. Hess St.
2015 1 2 MacNab St. N. Strachan St. Simcoe St.
2015 1 2 Kingsway Dr. Arkledun Ave. John St. S.
2015 1 2 Cathcart St. Kelly St. Cannon St.
2015 1 2 Cathcart St. Wilson St. Kelly St.
2015 1 2 Ontario Ave. Stinson St. Main St.
2015 1 2 Erie Ave. Stinson St. Main St.
2015 1 11 Winona Rd. Hwy. 8 Barton St.
2015 1 15 Griffin St. Main St. S. Franklin St.
2015 1 15 Griffin St. Franklin St. Mill St.
2015 2 7 Acadia Dr. St. Jean De Brebeuf St. Jean De Brebeuf
2015 2 15 Main St. S. Union St. School St.

Update: astute RTH reader Viv Saunders notes that in Table 2, New Ladder Crosswalk Installations Since 2013, some of the locations listed under Ward 10 are actually in Ward 11, specifically:

These listings are incorrect in the original table from the City.

Ryan McGreal, the editor of Raise the Hammer, lives in Hamilton with his family and works as a programmer, writer and consultant. Ryan volunteers with Hamilton Light Rail, a citizen group dedicated to bringing light rail transit to Hamilton. Ryan writes a city affairs column in Hamilton Magazine, and several of his articles have been published in the Hamilton Spectator. He also maintains a personal website and has been known to post passing thoughts on Twitter @RyanMcGreal. Recently, he took the plunge and finally joined Facebook.

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 14:46:13

We clearly should be pushing for 30km/h as the default speed, just like Toronto.

40 km/h is a compromise that many drivers won't see as a real difference and others will still object to. And it is not consistent with the vision zero commitment. 30 km/h is the standard for cities that are serious about safety. In addition to the cities mentioned in the article, Grenoble and its suburbs just adopted a default 30 km/h limit except on major arteries.

https://www.grenoble.fr/actualite/75/103...

This article (in French) also gives multiple reasons why 30 km/h is a good choice:

shorter stopping distance (13.3m compared with 27.7 m at 50 km/h)

risk of death nine times less

the average speed in an urban area is much less than 50 km/h due to congestion, intersections, signals, braking, acceleration etc so the net effect on the duration of a trip is minimal.

In fact, they estimate that the average speed drops only 1.6 km/h from 18.9 km/h to 17.3 km/h given all these effects.

Again, if Toronto can adopt 30 km/h, why can't we? We wouldn't even be a pioneer, just following a neighbouring city (with much more severe traffic and also subject to the "war on the car" rhetoric).

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-03-31 14:52:48

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By AnjoMan (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 06:55:50 in reply to Comment 117369

I just want to point out that in Toronto, the 30km/hr limit applies to residential streets. Dense, bustling streets with heavy pedestrians traffic are still running at 40-50km/hr (such as Yonge, Queen, King, College, Bloor). So while yes, we should praise Toronto council for moving in the right direction, there is also much room for improvement here.

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By CharlesBall (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 15:21:48

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By ergopepsi (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:07:01 in reply to Comment 117370

Probably not yet. Should we not aspire to 0 deaths?

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By CharlesBall (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 09:14:40 in reply to Comment 117379

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By Uh-huh (anonymous) | Posted April 02, 2016 at 17:21:40 in reply to Comment 117408

Don't worry. This site always hides comments that don't conform to their fascist views. As always, everyone else is wrong and only cyclists and road narrowers should be allowed to live and be free. Ryan will be mayor soon.

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By site almighty (anonymous) | Posted April 02, 2016 at 18:16:01 in reply to Comment 117435

Dude, the "site" is not sentient. Comments are hidden by individual humans who voted them down. Stop posting asinine comments and you won't be downvoted

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By Uh-huh (anonymous) | Posted April 02, 2016 at 19:42:21 in reply to Comment 117436

You just assume i am a dude? I am not. I am a girl. Typical of this site and some (by no means all) of its commenters. But, you are 'almighty' as your name says, so I guess anyone else's opinion/thoughts/gender doesn't matter. As long as you're happy. Which you're clearly not. As always, everyone else is wrong and only cyclists and road narrowers should be allowed to live and be free. Ryan will be mayor soon.

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By site almighty (anonymous) | Posted April 02, 2016 at 21:54:30 in reply to Comment 117437

Dude, "dude" has been unisēx for a while now. But way to twist your misunderstanding of the comment voting system into someone else being sēxist... So sorry that pedestrians are preventing you from living and being free. I guess you never walk to and from your car. It aopears selfishness is also unisēx.

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By Buck Up (anonymous) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 10:33:32 in reply to Comment 117408

Why don't you answer your own question.

What is the life of someone near and dear to you worth?

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By CharlesBall (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 12:37:37 in reply to Comment 117410

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By Ryan (registered) - website | Posted April 01, 2016 at 13:05:23 in reply to Comment 117412

Ugh, people are downvoting your comments because you persist in trying to frame this issue in terms of diminishing returns when there is no evidence that we are anywhere close to exhausting the set of low-cost opportunities to make our streets safer for all users.

Pavement markings, knockdown sticks, screw-down speed humps, chicanes, planter boxes, PXOs, curbside parking, trees, signage, and so on - these are all cheap tools, and to the extent that they replace some driving trips with walking and cycling trips, they actually reduce the lifecycle maintenance cost of the road.

Atlanta's pedestrian fatality rate is ten times as high as Berlin's. Do you honestly think Berlin spends something like ten times as much money on its roads as Atlanta? I would be surprised if Berlin even spends as much as the infamously autocentric Atlanta, let alone an order of magnitude more.

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By CharlesBall (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 13:53:22 in reply to Comment 117415

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Comment edited by CharlesBall on 2016-04-01 13:56:08

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By Ryan (registered) - website | Posted April 01, 2016 at 14:18:35 in reply to Comment 117418

Sigh, I should have known better than to engage the troll.

It isn't just about painting lines.

This is a strawman. I listed several cheap tools that cities can use to redesign existing street designs for safety.

When a street is due for reconstruction, the cost of rebuilding it as a safe, complete street is roughly the same as the cost of rebuilding it as an auto-centric street, but a complete street lasts longer before it needs replacing again.

There are 10-12 pedestrian death a year in Hamilton.

This is a strawman. There are also cyclist deaths, motorist deaths and many thousands of injuries.

If we force businesses to spend $100,000,000.00 a year

This is a strawman. You have simply made up a frighteningly large number that has no connection to reality.

Congratulations: you are officially as cute in your opposition to street safety as Councillor Whitehead.

Comment edited by administrator Ryan on 2016-04-01 14:20:06

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By menotlloyd (anonymous) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 14:57:28 in reply to Comment 117421

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By Ryan (registered) - website | Posted April 02, 2016 at 12:20:44 in reply to Comment 117426

"Vision Zero" is reductionist

Are you kidding? The laws of physics are reductionist, and with good reason: the explanation for why a 2,000 kg object colliding with a human body is far more likely to kill that human at 50 km/h than at 30 km/h reduces quite concisely to a simple formula:

kinetic energy = 1/2 X mass X velocity^2

I suppose one can make an argument that it's somehow better to leave our road system as it is and decide who to blame when someone inevitably makes an error that results in death or serious injury. However, one can't argue convincingly that it's infeasible to change our road system so that those predictable human errors don't result in death or serious injury in the first place.

the whole death issue is a red herring at best

Bollocks. Preventing preventable deaths is precisely what is at issue here.

and in terrorem at worst.

I fail to see how any reasonable person can feel threatened by the position: We don't want people to die needlessly due to predictable human error. I have a hard time imagining that anyone would actually want people to die needlessly (perhaps in order to make some kind of point about natural justice), but I suppose it's possible.

ad hominem and beneath you

If we're going to bandy around argumentative fallacies, let's use them correctly. Had I asserted, You're wrong because you're a troll, that would indeed be classic ad hominem. However, that's not what I did. Rather, I asserted, You're a troll because you persist in debating in bad faith.

CharlesBall is not wrong because he's a troll, he's wrong because he keeps making bad arguments and he keeps refusing to acknowledge the body of evidence that contradicts his unsupported assertions. That style of argument, in turn, is what is making him a troll in this context.

Comment edited by administrator Ryan on 2016-04-02 12:25:19

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By Justme (anonymous) | Posted April 02, 2016 at 14:11:08 in reply to Comment 117431

I have not read a lot here. And maybe this Chasball guy has been irritating in other posts. But the use of the word troll in the context of this conversation appears to me to be slightly venomous. Just my two cents.

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By Oh (anonymous) | Posted April 02, 2016 at 13:52:50 in reply to Comment 117431

I thought causes and reasons can be debatable, so if you can adequately defend the fact that you believe there was only a single reason, it won’t be fallacious.

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 14:08:16 in reply to Comment 117418

Vision zero is about safety for all road users (not just pedestrians). Hamilton has 20-30 traffic deaths per year and 2500-3500 injuries.

The ultimate goal is zero deaths (and many fewer injuries) and as Ryan says, we have a long way to go before the cost of making our streets safer becomes even a significant proportion of the $100 million we spend annually on roads. Right now we are talking about about the low hanging fruit ... there is no evidence that "major changes" will even be required (if you mean completely rebuilding every street).

The opposition to changes has not been on cost, but on inconvenience to drivers.

The total cost could actually be negative if the changes reduce the amount of driving and need to build and maintain the amount of lane kilometres we currently do.

Asking how much we are willing to spend is not helpful if we have no idea what the likely costs are. What's the point?

It might be a useful debate when we have a better understanding of what the costs (and benefits) are and what it might cost to get to zero.

Sweden has halved its death rate, is happy with what it has spent, and still believes zero is achievable.

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-04-01 14:09:24

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 15:54:41 in reply to Comment 117420

Just to be clear, considering the dollar "value" of a human life compared to the hypothetical marginal "cost" of the final changes necessary to eliminate the last death is not helpful because the question we are considering is whether to adopt and implement Vision Zero now under current conditions.

And Vision Zero has been shown to be beneficial long before we approach the zero death lower bound.

In other words, a Vision Zero approach reduces deaths (and injuries) better than the conventional "acceptable deaths" approach. And cost has not been an issue in places that have adopted it, it is more a question of prioritizing safety over speed and ease of driving (as the Economist article points out).

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-04-01 15:56:25

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By ergopepsi (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 09:49:51 in reply to Comment 117408

Sorry, your question did come across as rhetorical and I don't understand the question of how much we should spend per death? You mean on funeral expenses? Or on mops and power wash?

It might be interesting to approach the Vision Zero concept in increments. That is 0 deaths on residential streets (which may cost less to accommodate if that is our concern) and then 0 deaths on minor arterials and then 0 deaths on major arterials. Each increment may cost more to achieve but is that what is most important in life? Dollars? What about the happiness you might feel living in a city where no-one is killed by a car?

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By CharlesBall (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 12:43:39 in reply to Comment 117409

I mean how much should we spend per death to prevent the deaths. See above.

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By ergopepsi (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 14:20:35 in reply to Comment 117413

Well, just to be equally ghoulish, if all deaths occurred in one intersection and you improve that intersection you'll get more bang for your buck, right?

These kinds of improvements aren't solely for the prevention of death and injury. They also improve quality of life for pedestrians and motorists and extend the lifespan of the street.

On the topic of death...my brother-in-law's brother was struck by a car when he was 18. He was thrown 30 feet and suffered extensive injuries. The most life altering of those was a brain injury which left him with the cognitive ability of a six year old. This accident occurred almost 40 years ago. He is still alive and lives in a group home. I would imagine the costs to the province to care for him over the past 40 years are significant. But, when you see what it did to the family the cost is absolutely irrelevant.

Think hard about it. Will you really feel the pinch? Can you ever really tell when your taxes go up or down? I've been paying for 20+ years and I couldn't tell you how one tax break or hike affected me. Maybe put down the moral calculator and see if you can eliminate cost from your judgement.

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 15:30:58 in reply to Comment 117370

I don't know if any large city has reached the zero goal it, but Sweden adopted it in 1997 as a country of 8 million and has made remarkable progress.

Remember, it is a goal and it might take a long time to reach it, or it might not be possible to reach exactly zero, but the idea is to change the perception that a certain number of deaths are fine (and inevitable) and we can be satisfied with how things are. The total number of fatalities has been on a sharp downward trend since 2003.

http://www.abudhabiroadsafetyforum.com/w...

http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist...

With only three of every 100,000 Swedes dying on the roads each year, compared with 5.5 per 100,000 across the European Union, 11.4 in America and 40 in the Dominican Republic, which has the world's deadliest traffic, Sweden’s roads have become the world’s safest.

Roads in Sweden are built with safety prioritised over speed or convenience.

Will the Swedes ever hit their "zero" target? Road-safety campaigners are confident that it is possible. With deaths reduced by half since 2000, they are well on their way.

Most workplaces have a zero fatality/accident goal, which is an important guiding principle, even if they don't always manage to achieve the goal. Why should you be less safe in public than in your place of work?

The take another example: France's TGV high speed rail system was designed with passenger safety in mind and has had zero passenger fatalities since the first train ran in 1980. Pretty remarkable for trains that travel over 300 km/h! This shows that careful engineering can indeed reduce the danger of transportation infrastructure.

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-03-31 15:35:35

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By mountain66 (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 15:36:16

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By thanksdad (anonymous) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 07:34:25 in reply to Comment 117372

The words of a selfish asshole. OUT OF YOUR WAY! YOU'RE A MOTORIST!

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By AnjoMan (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 06:57:37 in reply to Comment 117372

It's silly to think that anyone should have to walk a half block just to cross the street. #slowthecars

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By DowntownInHamilton (registered) | Posted April 02, 2016 at 20:06:19 in reply to Comment 117400

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By JasonL (registered) | Posted April 02, 2016 at 20:41:57 in reply to Comment 117438

Yea because in Hamilton cars can't get anywhere freely and quickly. They've been relegated to a non-functional means of transport. I mean, I can't believe anyone in Hamilton owns one. Where do they drive them? The whole city is built around transit, walking and biking. Cars are just stuck 24-7 on the odd remaining street left for them to use on the periphery of the city.....

Comment edited by JasonL on 2016-04-02 20:43:33

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By DowntownInHamilton (registered) | Posted April 03, 2016 at 09:18:45 in reply to Comment 117439

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By MattM (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 16:13:33 in reply to Comment 117372

here's an idea: stop victim blaming. there have been multiple cases where pedestrians have been killed in this city while legally crossing the street at a signalized intersection or even walking on the sidewalk. should they have not even left the house since there's a chance that a motorist could mount the sidewalk and kill them?

you seemed to skip right over the part about laws of physics.

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By AnjoMan (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 07:00:24 in reply to Comment 117375

Sadly, there is a case before the courts in NYC where the defense is arguing that the victim (who was killed by a police van while he had the right to cross) accepted the risk that something like this could happen simply by leaving his house.

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 15:41:41 in reply to Comment 117372

So you don't mind if people die or are injured as long as it's their fault (even the deaths are preventable)?

And why do you think crossing between intersections is a major contributor to pedestrian injuries and deaths? Look at the recent pedestrian deaths for Hamilton ... most were killed walking on the sidewalk or crossing legally.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/news/pedestrian-dies-hamilton-crosswalk-1.3363022 https://www.raisethehammer.org/article/1...

The idea is to make the streets fault-tolerant not play the blame game to either pedestrians or motorists.

p.s. Why is there no crosswalk on the south side of the James/Charlton intersection on James? There is a huge lack of safe pedestrian crossings throughout the city.

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-03-31 15:47:16

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By mountain66 (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 15:58:16 in reply to Comment 117373

There is a cross walk on the north side of Charlton, I don't know how many times people have just walked out in front of me while they are on their phone & not paying attention. There are 3 crosswalks within 2 blocks in that section & 3 sets of lights.

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By ergopepsi (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 16:26:45 in reply to Comment 117374

Then you should be paying better attention. They can't kill you with their cellphones...

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 16:25:37 in reply to Comment 117374

Why should a pedestrian have to walk three sides of the intersection just to cross the street? This happened to me when I was walking down James S trying to get to the hospital!

Distracted pedestrians are annoying (but far less dangerous than distracted drivers), but complaining about it is not going to save any lives, and jaywalking is not a significant contributor to pedestrian deaths and injuries.

It's just a red herring distracting us from the real problem (people getting killed and injured). It's like when we try to get bike lanes and someone says "I saw a cyclist not stop at a stop sign". We didn't wait until all motorists obeyed the speed limit before we added seat belts, abs and air bags to cars!

Anecdotes about "bad" pedestrians (or "bad" drivers) don't help anything, especially when they amount to victim blaming. What does the pedestrian who is killed on a sidewalk or in a crosswalk have to do with the different pedestrian who annoyed you by looking at their cell phone?

No city has ever made a difference to traffic injuries and fatalities just by asking everyone to be more careful! It doesn't work.

On the other hand, we do know what works: reduce vehicle speed to 30km/h which reduces the chance of an accident (since the driver has more reaction time) and reduces the severity of the accident and the chances of death to almost nil (since energy goes like speed squared).

Designing streets so drivers need to pay attention (narrow lanes, chicanes, overhanging trees) also works.

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-03-31 16:31:49

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:03:28

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By JasonL (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 13:19:17 in reply to Comment 117378

yep, I saw two pedestrians bonk heads last week on the sidewalk, not watching where they were walking.

Sadly, one has died and that stretch of sidewalk is closed for the time being while the city repairs the downed street poles and damaged storefronts.

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By AnjoMan (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 07:12:41 in reply to Comment 117378

The blame does belong on cars - they are big, heavy and fast, and when a driver OR pedestrian makes a mistake in/around them someone can easily be hurt or killed. Even if a pedestrian walks out in the street and is at fault, it's still the fact that a car is involved that makes it a life-threatening interaction.

At the end of the day, we can blame pedestrians or drivers as much as we want but we are never going to regulate or educate them out of making mistakes. This is why we have to change our street designs to make living around and using cars less dangerous.

Comment edited by AnjoMan on 2016-04-01 07:13:17

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:10:06 in reply to Comment 117378

This article (and my comments) are specifically against blaming pedestrian or motorists and finding solutions that result in less deaths.

But those solutions that are proven to work naturally involve the most dangerous part of the interaction: the motor vehicle. Simply slowing motor vehicles makes everyone safer and we don't have to keep "blaming" anyone. Slower traffic means more margin of error for both motorists and pedestrians.

But quite clearly, it is the cars that kill people, regardless of whether it is the motorist or the pedestrian who is to "blame" for the collision (and of course cars kill a lot of motorists as well). Again, this is basic physics.

The whole point of vision zero is to stop blaming and focus on reducing deaths. And that means looking at solutions that actually work, rather than asking people to be more careful.

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-03-31 17:11:07

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:26:21 in reply to Comment 117380

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:47:53 in reply to Comment 117382

Of course, if there wasn't a car involved no one would have been killed or injured! But that's not the same as blaming motorists it's simply recognizing what the most dangerous component of the interaction is.

It would be great if everyone (pedestrians, cyclists, motorists) were more careful. But hoping for this hasn't helped for the past 100 years and won't help in the future.

We might 'need' more common sense, but how do propose to magically generate enough common sense to stop the deaths and injuries?

Simply exhort people to be more careful? Reminding people to be careful can't hurt, especially for children, but it has been shown to be ineffective. There will always been inattentive people, both drivers and pedestrians, but there should not be a death penalty for inattentiveness!

You're proposing doing nothing and just accepting that thousands will be killed and injured by cars (motorists, pedestrians and cyclists, those who are to 'blame' and those who are 'innocent').

It's your attitude that Vision Zero is trying to change!

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-03-31 17:50:58

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:52:00 in reply to Comment 117383

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:58:04 in reply to Comment 117385

Stupid people aren't killed on the TGV ... which hasn't had a pedestrian fatality for 36 years. They eliminated all level crossings and the entire line is fenced (not to mention various automatic controls to deal with driver and signal failures).

Of course, they could have left off the fences and kept the level crossings and just exhorted motorists to be careful and pay attention when the train roars by at 300 km/h!

Let's drop the speed limit to 30 km/h and be very happy with the big reductions in injuries and deaths of motorists and pedestrians. We can worry about the "stupid" people when the changes stop producing results. We're very far from that point right now!

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-03-31 17:58:25

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By jim (anonymous) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 22:18:52 in reply to Comment 117387

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By Ryan (registered) - website | Posted April 02, 2016 at 13:24:26 in reply to Comment 117429

What a fascinating theory! Let's test it out using some recent examples.

Last December 11, an 81-year-old woman was killed while lawfully crossing Queenston at Reid, when a left-turning driver failed to notice her and crashed into her.

On December 3, a 74-year-old man was struck while lawfully crossing the street at Barton and Catharine.

On November 25, a 62-year-old man was struck while walking lawfully on the sidewalk on York near Hess when the driver crossed the sidewalk pulling out of a parking lot.

In all these cases, the police determined that the driver was at fault and laid charges.

Do you think these pedestrians were likely to be active RTH readers?

Do you think they were "stupid" or "subversive misfits" or "dummkopfs"?

Do you think they deserved to be killed just for having the temerity to go about their business lawfully at the same time that someone happened to be operating a powerful motor vehicle with insufficient care?

Would you say this to their faces?

Would you explain to their next of kin that they died because they were stupid to think they should be allowed to travel lawfully in their own community without being struck by a car and killed?

Would you feel that way if they were your own parents or grandparents and not just some story in the news?

Do you still think your caustic sociopath shtick is "fun"? Because it's not.

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By jim (anonymous) | Posted April 03, 2016 at 08:04:56 in reply to Comment 117432

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By ergopepsi (registered) | Posted April 03, 2016 at 08:41:21 in reply to Comment 117443

When your wife is done with the cleaning can you get her to edit your posts?

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By Propogandist (anonymous) | Posted April 03, 2016 at 06:44:53 in reply to Comment 117432

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 18:34:47 in reply to Comment 117387

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:57:59 in reply to Comment 117385

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 18:00:59 in reply to Comment 117386

So you are in favour of the 30km/h limit, which has proven to provide results, provided there are still penalties for drivers or pedestrians or cyclists who break the rules and there is education for all road users?

That sounds reasonable.

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2016-03-31 18:01:33

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 18:00:14 in reply to Comment 117386

We need to have a serious hard push on both engineering and education. One without the other is never going to get the results we all want to see

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By ryanssockpuppet (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:18:32

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By AnjoMan (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 07:28:39 in reply to Comment 117381

The only way to do this in a city would be to ban cars. Any alternative would eliminate anything we could call city.

pedestrian chasm

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 17:50:39 in reply to Comment 117381

That sounds pretty extreme: are you really proposing banning cars from dense urban areas? Of course, many cities have brought in pedestrian only precincts, but very few have banned cars entirely.

Wouldn't it be much more reasonable to slow traffic to a safe speed, 30 km/h? And the woonerf streets do the opposite of what you're suggesting: mixing everyone together with no sidewalks. And they're safe for everyone.

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By KevinLove (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 02:12:36 in reply to Comment 117384

Virtually every Dutch city has a downtown car-free zone. Some are quite extensive.

Supercrawl demonstrates that we can have a car-free downtown in Hamilton for five days. We just need to make it permanent.

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 18:07:56

30 for secondary and 40 for all arterial roads seems reasonable but without police enforcement within 5 rather than only over 10 speed limits don't even matter

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By kevlahan (registered) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 18:10:05 in reply to Comment 117390

Agreed.

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By KevinLove (registered) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 02:04:35 in reply to Comment 117392

Which is precisely why New York City is introducing photo radar speed enforcement in school zones.

They changed. We can too.

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 18:15:11 in reply to Comment 117392

Photo radar lots and lots of it

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By For crying out loud (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 18:10:00

More pedestrian crossings mandatory

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By Why? (anonymous) | Posted March 31, 2016 at 23:49:48

It seems to me when I travel around Dundas and Ancaster that it's quite common for residential streets to have posted 40 km/h limits. Why do we have to beg for them in the lower City?

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By Mrogynist (anonymous) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 08:57:42

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By hand-wavy (anonymous) | Posted April 01, 2016 at 14:30:55

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By notlloyd (registered) - website | Posted April 01, 2016 at 15:13:05 in reply to Comment 117424

Bigot.

Is this type of post allowed here? Might as well use the N word.

Comment edited by notlloyd on 2016-04-01 15:13:46

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By Jim Street (anonymous) | Posted April 03, 2016 at 07:43:36

I always wonder why there are no flashing signs and reduced speed limits for cars passing Dr. Davey, Hess St. School and SJAM like there is for the schools along Governors Road in Dundas...

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By JasonL (registered) | Posted April 04, 2016 at 13:11:43 in reply to Comment 117442

There is now next to Dr Davey. Flashing 40km. And on Wilson St, 40 seems perfect. Not sure what the hold up is on a 30-km side street norm, and 40-km main street norm, with streets like southern Upper James or Cootes Dr being 50km still.

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By DowntownInHamilton (registered) | Posted April 03, 2016 at 09:27:04 in reply to Comment 117442

There are along Charlton at Queen Victoria school, and a few others in the lower city.

However, why not just make this mandatory for all school zones to have it? We used to see the police stopping cars in the morning who were speeding through the speed reduction in the mornings several times a week along Charlton.

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