Transportation

Curbside Bicycle Parking in Portland

By Jason Leach
Published October 06, 2009

Never mind bike lanes, which are proving to be a big battle in these parts. How about taking away a lane of traffic for bike parking?

New Portland Bicycle Parking 1 (Image Source: Flickr)
New Portland Bicycle Parking 1 (Image Source: Flickr)

We are so behind the times in Hamilton/Toronto it's not even funny.

Jason Leach was born and raised in the Hammer and currently lives downtown with his wife and children. You can follow him on twitter.

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By Meredith (registered) - website | Posted October 08, 2009 at 15:37:30

I can't believe no one's commented on this yet. This one picture sums up so much about what's different between there and here it's unbelievable.

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By A Smith (anonymous) | Posted October 08, 2009 at 19:33:06

Jason, if Portland has the largest percentage of cyclists in the U.S. at 6%, is it right to think that that cyclists in Hamilton should get any more than 6% of the road width? If the issue is fairness, why should cyclists get more than their fair share of the road?

This link also explains why Denmark has so many cyclists relative to drivers...the government taxes gas so heavily that it produces gas prices of $7 gallon. If the government allowed the free market to work, people in Denmark would give up their bikes and go back to using cars.

tinyurl.com/yksjqqo

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By Capitalist (anonymous) | Posted October 09, 2009 at 14:36:22

Jason, many people around these parts ride bikes. They are called poor people.

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By i can say anything and it is fact (anonymous) | Posted October 10, 2009 at 21:00:56

capitalist, many people around these parts ride bikes. they are called rich people.

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By jason (registered) | Posted October 11, 2009 at 22:14:36

If you think our gasoline prices are the result of a 'free market' you're more clueless than we thought. The US has the lowest gas prices in the world despite having no domestic supply and being the largest oil consumer in the world. In a true free market, they would have to pay through their nose to get access to oil/gas supplies. But as we all know, a free market hasn't existed in the US, and to a large extent Canada, for decades.

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By A Smith (anonymous) | Posted October 12, 2009 at 20:31:02

Jason >> In a true free market, they would have to pay through their nose to get access to oil/gas supplies.

According to the Ministry of Finance in the Netherlands, taxes make up 68.84% of the cost of gasoline/petrol ( tinyurl.com/yjmurhk ).

According to the U.S. Dept of Energy, gas prices in the Netherlands were US$7.38/gal as of 9/29/09 (tinyurl.com/386tv). If we take the taxes out of the price of gas, we get US$2.29/gal.

The current price of gas in the U.S is US$2.71. The average tax/gal of gas in the U.S. averages 47.3 cents/gal ( www.api.org/statistics/fueltaxes/ ). If we take out gas taxes from U.S. prices, we end up with US$2.24/gal.

If you compare the Pre-Tax/Free Market prices of gas in both the U.S. and The Netherlands you get almost the same figure, US$2.24-2.29/gal.

Jason, in a true free market, would the people of The Netherlands pay more or less than the current US$7.38/gal for gasoline?

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By Ryan (registered) - website | Posted October 13, 2009 at 08:48:11

The US has the lowest gas prices in the world despite having no domestic supply and being the largest oil consumer in the world.

Actually, the US produces something like six or seven million barrels of oil a day. The problem is that they consume over 20 million barrels a day. The US hit its oil production peak in 1971 at around 10 million bpd and has been declining ever since - precisely, I should point out, the way peak oil theory predicts.

One of the many problems with the idea of a "free market" for oil is that many of the costs of oil come in the form of externalities - costs produced by the exchange and consumption of oil but borne by neither the buyer nor the seller. In Europe, stiff taxes exist to cover those externalities, like damage air pollution and smog, negative public health effects, GHG emissions and so on.

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By A Smith (anonymous) | Posted October 13, 2009 at 12:57:03

Ryan >> stiff taxes exist to cover those externalities, like damage air pollution and smog, negative public health effects, GHG emissions and so on.

According to CIA World Factbook (2009 estimates), both Canada and Australia both have longer life expectancy than either Denmark or The Netherlands ( tinyurl.com/yvls29 ). Curiously enough, these nations have much lower gas taxes and prices that are around US$0.94-1.00/gal. In contrast, Denmark and The Netherlands have high gas taxes with gas prices coming in around US$2.00/gal.

If gas taxes are supposed to make people healthier, how do you explain the fact that people in Canada and Australia live longer even though gas prices are cheaper.

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By z jones (registered) | Posted October 13, 2009 at 13:36:00

Your right ASmith, there couldn't possibly be more than one factor affecting life expectency. Fail, please see me after class. :P

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By A Smith (anonymous) | Posted October 13, 2009 at 13:58:53

z jones >> there couldn't possibly be more than one factor affecting life expectency.

Tell that to Ryan.

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By frank (registered) | Posted October 13, 2009 at 15:07:06

Ya, cuz it was Ryan who said it in the first place :S WHAT??????!?!?!??!? Why isn't that dead horse moving?

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By Ryan (registered) - website | Posted October 13, 2009 at 15:46:19

I see that A Smith continues to evince contempt for the most basic principles of debate.

His comments on RTH could be the case material for a first-year course on informal logic, as they demonstrate nearly all the common logical fallacies: argument from ignorance, bare assertion fallacy, biased sample fallacy, coincidental correlation fallacy, moving-the-goalpost fallacy, naturalistic fallacy, loaded question fallacy, single cause fallacy, straw man fallacy, suppressed correlative fallacy, wrong direction fallacy - and, of course, the old Latin standbys argumentum ad nauseum and argumentum verbosium.

My advice is not to bother bother trying to debate with someone who has proven consistently over a year and a half that he has no interest in the truth. A 'debate' with A Smith is a logical black hole from which you will never recover the time and energy wasted trying to correct the relentless stream of nonsense.

It cheapens the overall debate, usurps and derails the discussion (the troll's real purpose), and discourages others who may have more constructive contributions from bothering to participate.

Please, just downvote and move on.

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By A Smith (anonymous) | Posted October 13, 2009 at 16:16:13

Comments with a score below -5 are hidden by default.

You can change or disable this comment score threshold by registering an RTH user account.

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By Ryan (registered) - website | Posted October 13, 2009 at 16:32:05

Ryan: High gas taxes are necessary to pay for extra health care costs associated with gasoline consumption.

As a final reply to a comment by you in this thread, I offer this quote as an example of the straw man fallacy to which you commonly resort when debating. As usual, instead of responding to my real argument you have chosen to distort a small part of it and attack that distortion.

I will say this about you: due to your tenacity, attentiveness, inventiveness in manufacturing quasi-arguments and sheer dedication, you have been remarkably successful in your attempts to troll this forum and obstruct any other form of participation aside from countering your bottomless stream of nonsense.

It's a shame that you've dedicated so much time and energy to this antisocial behaviour rather than doing something constructive.

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