Comment 35287

By seancb (registered) - website | Posted November 11, 2009 at 12:36:10

You are wrong. Let's start with the building directly across from the GO centre: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthre...

And the Chateau Royale (which you classify as crappy)

Those are probably the largest and closest.

There's also the London Tap House which is a couple blocks away but still within the neighbourhood.

But it doesn't always have to be the big guys that matter...

Here is nice little stretch of small businesses that are relatively new: http://tinyurl.com/ybmyele

There's Gallagher's at John and Augusta, and the businesses north on John on the same block.

The successful pubs on Augusta

James south shops

All of these benefit from the GO presence.

And for a look at property standards, take a stroll here: http://tinyurl.com/yeuc9f3

Is there room for improvement in this area? Of course - there always is - but to brush all of the homes and businesses aside because it doesn't fit with your derisive attitude toward transit hubs is not fair or accurate.

And if you read my earlier post about the physical attributes of light rail versus other transit (i.e. greyhound and GO), you'll hopefully understand why LRT hasmore development potential than a regional transit hub.

The closest comparison would be to take a look at spadina, where the streetcars were given right of way versus Union Station in toronto. Union spurs development in a radius around the nbode, whereas the entire stretch of spadina thrives due to transit placement. Compare spadina to University. Then add in the fact that LRT does even better than old-style streetcars when it comes to ridership and development.

Take a look at the case studies of every recent LRT installation in north america. All are successful - it's just a matter of HOW successful. Hamilton is not special. As long as we build it correctly we WILL reap the benefits as seen in other cities small and large.

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