Suburban Bureau

Remembrance Day Ceremonies and Armouries Tour

The John W. Foote VC Armoury building is 100 years old this year. To commemorate Remembrance Day as well as the Armoury's anniversary, here is a photo tour of the parade and the building.

By Trey Shaughnessy
Published November 23, 2006

Remembrance Day Parade marching past Lister Block.
Remembrance Day Parade marching past Lister Block.

The crowd gathers to pay respect at the Gore Park Cenotaph.
The crowd gathers to pay respect at the Gore Park Cenotaph.

John W. Foote VC Armouries in Hamilton, Ontario on James Street North. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the building. Built in 1906 by Pigott Construction, it was the company's first non-residential building. An extensive tunnel system linked the building to Dundurn Castle. Some of the tunnel network still exists.
John W. Foote VC Armouries in Hamilton, Ontario on James Street North. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the building. Built in 1906 by Pigott Construction, it was the company's first non-residential building. An extensive tunnel system linked the building to Dundurn Castle. Some of the tunnel network still exists.

John Weir Foote VC Armoury, 200 James Street North

John Weir Foote VC Armoury, 200 James Street North

Building medallion
Building medallion

Inner courtyard
Inner courtyard

This corner detail looks very much like Pigott construction work.
This corner detail looks very much like Pigott construction work.

The caption reads:

Their name liveth for evermore
To the Glorious memory of the Officers, Warrant Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and men of the 91st Regiment Canadian Highlanders who in the path of duty died for the cause of humanity in the Great War.
1914 - 1918

The enormous front-gabled wooden roof with steel lattice covers the largest room in the building - 100 years old and no leaks. This room is used for training and large gatherings. In a time of crisis this room could be used to temporarily house many people with cots.
The enormous front-gabled wooden roof with steel lattice covers the largest room in the building - 100 years old and no leaks. This room is used for training and large gatherings. In a time of crisis this room could be used to temporarily house many people with cots.

Training floor
Training floor

Interesting stair detail
Interesting stair detail

Corporal Bill Mallinson, Aryll and Sutherland Highlanders
Corporal Bill Mallinson, Aryll and Sutherland Highlanders

Since 1862 Hamilton has had a military regiment. Hamilton's 13th Battalion was one of Canada's first armed forces. The Highland Rifle Company was one of the three rifle companies that comprised the 13th Battalion. In 1865 this Battalion was deployed to Fort Erie to defend the British Dominion from Irish Nationalist Fenians. It later became known as 13th Royal Regiment and then the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry.

Albainn Gu-Brath (Scotland forever – Gaelic). The crest motto of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders reflects the proud Scottish heritage of Scots-Canadians.
Albainn Gu-Brath (Scotland forever – Gaelic). The crest motto of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders reflects the proud Scottish heritage of Scots-Canadians.

Trey lives in Williamsville NY via Hamilton. He is a Marketing Manager for Tourism and Destination Marketing in the Buffalo-Niagara Metro.

His essays have appeared in The Energy Bulletin, Post Carbon Institute, Peak Oil Survival, and Tree Hugger.

And can't wait for the day he stops hearing "on facebook".

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By MattM (registered) | Posted November 25, 2006 at 16:14:38

I attended the ceremony. It was beautiful. Sadly I missed the march up James North. It would have been powerful to see them marching in front of Lister Block... a building that saw the victory parades after World War 2.

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By REMEMBER ME? (anonymous) | Posted October 30, 2007 at 18:24:38

Take a look at National Steel Car's website tribute for Remembrance Day.
Go to: www.steelcar.com
Click on "Heritage" then click on "Remembrance Day, 2007".
It's really awesome. Web address below.

www.steelcar.com

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By Former Argyll (anonymous) | Posted February 11, 2008 at 00:10:56

As someone who was once in the Argylls, I enjoyed this article immensely. The John V. Foote armory certainly is an architectural marvel even to this day. Until now, I had always thought that the rumor of the tunnel to Dundurn Castle was an urban legend. Now I know differently.

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By Brian Canuck Murza-R33894777 (anonymous) | Posted November 05, 2010 at 14:07:13

Regretfully, our once great country of Canada is in a desperate situation due to the Hamilton Police Force. Not only is this country`s Police Forces, politicians and government heads and officials; neglecting their duty, they are guilty of high treason, as we have Canadian military personnel in a war zone in Afghanistan.This must be corrected at once, as Remembrance Day is very near.The men and women who paid the supreme sacrifice while donning a Canadian uniform; either during war time or peace time, did not do it for the reason our country is in today.

Brian Canuck Murza
R33894777
W.W.II Naval Researcher Author
Montreal Quebec Canada

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By Mythbuster (anonymous) | Posted November 22, 2011 at 14:35:28

Unfortunately, the rumour of a tunnel to Dundurn Castle is actually still just a rumour. The tunnels at the Armoury do not lead to Dundurn Castle. There is only one tunnel at Dundurn, and that was built by the British in 1812. It now leads to the laundry room.

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