Comment 34863

By A Smith (anonymous) | Posted October 17, 2009 at 19:59:08

Really?, you can check city records, but I would bet you money that the plaza is not more than three years old, if that.

>> you're calling a Gas Station a decent development!?

Not at all, but it's much better than an empty building.

>> this stretch is another that has a great streetwall with stores facing the street & nice wide sidewalks

I like the look of the older buildings as well, but not if they are vacant. I don't know if the city is responsible for the massive parking lot in the front of the new plaza, but I agree it is less pleasing to the eye than the streetwall effect.

Having said that, the last thing this area of city needs is more public sector activity, it actually needs less. Neighbourhoods are great ONLY when they are dominated by the private sector, that's why Locke St is more appealing than Gore Park and why Hess St attracts more people than City Hall.

This is a snippet from Wikipedia on the origins of the term Laissez-faire...

According to historical folklore, the phrase stems from a meeting c. 1680 between the powerful French finance minister Jean-Baptiste Colbert and a group of French businessmen led by a certain M. Le Gendre. When the eager mercantilist minister asked how the French state could be of service to the merchants, Le Gendre replied simply "Laissez-nous faire" ('Leave us be,' lit. 'Let us do').

In other words, if all the politicians would just stop trying to help, this area of the city and the city as a whole would go back to being prosperous. Hamilton was a great and prosperous city far before the era of big government and it could be that again if politicians would just mind their own business.

Our history is proof that small government is quite effective at attracting investment, creating good paying jobs and building a vibrant city. Our history also shows us that relying on the government is a sure way to turn a once prosperous city into a common beggar.

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