Comment 88

By Fossil (anonymous) | Posted None at

Regarding 'genetically-engineered algae' for a real life horror story and hint of things that may come... see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2000/killeralgae.shtml I suppose some really think that the answer to all our problems would be a heavy dose of genetic pollution wrapped in assurances from Monsanto. Keep in mind that most genetic engineering schemes are built around squeezing more corporate profits out of a crop by pumping in low cost oil. They "displace" small local farmers -- into the growing slums. The bottom lines of corporations do not include 'external' environmental or human costs, but they have great marketing. Bio fuels can only exacerbate environmental problems and human starvation -- currently 5000 dying per hour 24/7. That's 1.6 World Trade Towers every hour of every day, day after day. Mostly children. But "they" don't count. Some folks just want to have 'fun' in their metal wombs (softly, safely carried, blissfully protected from the elements and other nasty aspects of reality) -- irregardless of who they hurt or what they destroy. Locked into a paradox, their lifestyle requires driving, which undermines their lifestyle, and life itself. We can't drive away from Peak Oil. Perhaps we should start breeding horses... but even horses used 1/4 of all the agricultural production in pre-oil days (organic). Of course, people back then had far less population pressure for arable land -- and in many areas they still had good, healthy, non-eroded topsoil. Those days are long gone. We are due for an oil hangover, a worldwide crash of civilization -- famines, disease, violence, discomfort... and ultimately, few, if any, survivors. And those 'lucky' few who might survive will live in ways comparable to our recent pre-oil ancestors, but not nearly as easily, or as well, on a barren, polluted, depleted, planet. I guess all we can say now to the hope of future generations is "Good luck. Hey, at least WE had a good time."

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